Netizen 24 GBR: Motor neurone disease and how the Ice Bucket Challenge threw Stephen Hawking's illness into the spotlight

By On March 14, 2018

Motor neurone disease and how the Ice Bucket Challenge threw Stephen Hawking's illness into the spotlight

Professor Stephen Hawking never considered his incurable disease to be a “serious handicap” and defied the paralysing illness to become one of the world’s most acclaimed physicists.

The world renowned Oxford physicist, who has died at the age of 76, once said he felt “lucky” his motor neurone disease (MND) did not prevent him from pursuing his lifelong research which focused on tackling fundamental questions about the origins of the universe.

“All of my life I have sought to understand the universe and find answers to these questions,” he told a conference in February 2008. “I have been very lucky that my disease has not been a serious handicap, indeed it has probably given me more time than most people to pursue the quest for knowledge.”

Prof Hawking believed his disabilities gave him more time to focus on resea rch, by “shielding me from lecturing and administrative work that I would otherwise have been involved in”, he told Science Digest in 1984.

The author of the 1988 bestseller A Brief History of Time was given only a few years to live when he was diagnosed with MND, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as a 22-year-old student in 1964.

Source: Google News

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